Monday, 29 June 2015

Q&A with authors of the Demons, Imps, Incubi anthology + GIVEAWAY!

For the release of the Demons, Imps and Incubi anthology I am sharing with you today a short Q&A with three authors of the anthology: Cori Vidae, Erzabet Bishop and Nicole Blackwood, who tell us a bit more about their approach to the paranormal, demons & co. So read on and don't forget to enter the giveaway at the end to win a copy of the Demons, Imps and Incubi anthology! :-)

Demons, Imps, Incubi - an anthology by Cori Vidae, Alexa Piper, Erzabet Bishop, Mark Greenmill, Nicole Blackwood, J. C. G. Goelz, Jeffery Armadillo and M. Arbroath

Demons, Imps, Incubi: dark, powerful, and forbidden. Only the foolish would seek one out for seduction, and yet . . . deals are struck. Souls are ensnared.

But must a demon's agenda always be demonic? Can he be redeemed? Or does being bad feel too good to bother with redemption? Long ago, imps were more mischievous and playful--naughty, perhaps?—and perceptions of them have only grown more sinister over the centuries. The incubus craves sex, but what makes us crave him?

Explore dark and sensual worlds with eight brand new stories of magic and seduction that will set you aflame by Cori Vidae, Alexa Piper, Erzabet Bishop, Mark Greenmill, Nicole Blackwood, J. C. G. Goelz, Jeffery Armadillo, and M. Arbroath.

Buy at Amazon - Kobo - All Romance

Cori Vidae

Q: What place do you think demons play in human story-telling? Why do we continue to tell stories about monsters/creatures with questionable morality?

A: Oh, I don’t know. Could be we use them to explore the darker sides of ourselves, or they provide the perfect medium to test out new moralities, or because to believe in Good, we have to believe in Evil. Or, in romance especially, it could be we all just like a story that comes with a frisson inspired equally by fear and attraction.

Q: What made you decide to set the story during WWI, on a lonely, windswept Canadian prairie? Could this story be told as well if set somewhere else?

A: This may seem odd to say about an erotic romance, but I set the story where I did because my family came from the lonely, windswept Canadian prairie and I wanted to honor that. In fact, when I started writing, I began with the setting, not the demon. So, no, I don’t think the story could be told as well if it were set elsewhere. The time period matters, and so does Mary’s isolation.


Erzabet Bishop

Q: What place do you think demons play in human story-telling? Why do we continue to tell stories about monsters/creatures with questionable morality?

A: Demons represent everything we’re told from day one we aren’t supposed to have or want. Sex, money, physical things of this world. Human nature will never change. People have basic needs and no matter how good you try to be, sooner or later they find their way to the surface. In fiction, you can imagine how just one little exaggeration of lust or greed can take you to the next level and bam--you have a demon on your tail.

I think we write about and read about demons to escape the rigors of the everyday. To feel like we are taking risks and living life to the fullest even when we only do that through the pages of a book. There is just something fun about pushing the envelope and having that fantasy. Sex with an incubus without losing your soul? It would take a goddess, and that is what every woman, in her heart, longs to be.

Q: What drew you to telling a story from the POV of a Greek Goddess?

Oh, wow. They are so much fun! The power they wield can harm or heal. They hold life and death in the palm of their hand. What’s not to love? (And they get to wear all kinds of kick butt clothes and hang out at places like the Elysian Club.) A side benefit is not being drained by an incubus. Not that--whew! Think about it. Pretty awesome.


Nicole Blackwood

Q: What place do you think demons play in human story-telling? Why do we continue to tell stories about monsters/creatures with questionable morality?

A: I think that depends on the demon, and the story. Many demons are connected to religions and cultures, and they have their own sets of rules and meanings. Some are meant as warnings, to try and guide people away from paths that will lead to the destruction of self or others. Some are more abstractly symbolic, and that’s where the plot of the story is really more important in terms of learning. There are many other instances where demons are just creatures, like any other animal or sentient being, that fall outside the realm of earthly reality. They can be good, evil, or a more familiar mix of the two, but with weird powers and awesome bodies. Writing something so alien and connecting it to the human experience is a sort of adventure.

I think we continue to tell stories about monsters or creatures with questionable morality because it’s a way to explore ourselves. I know how that sounds. But really, what better way to analyze our darkness, and find the bits of light underneath or all wrapped up in it, than to tell stories? Stories are safe. We can write about things like torture and slaughter, learn what drives them and results from them, find out what makes villains – and then change our own attitudes and actions to avoid and prevent these things in our lives.

Q: Why did you decide to write from the opposing gender’s POV? In your experience, what are the challenges and rewards of doing so?

A: It’s not something I planned to do. I sat down not knowing anything about the story except that it would take place at a kitschy little diner called Kiki’s Tiki Lounge. I honestly thought it would be told from Kiki’s point of view, because I could envision her so clearly right away. But it was Benji who stepped up and started describing the lounge in the first chapter. And when he described Kiki, it was his view of her that really drew me to him. I kept expecting to switch over to Kiki’s POV soon enough, but Benji intrigued me so much I couldn’t get away from him – and it didn’t take long before I didn’t want to.

This is only the second male protagonist I’ve ever written. I’ve written other male key characters, but none whose heads I’ve gotten into as firmly as Benji’s. The biggest challenge by far was the sex scene. Love is easy enough to write, I think. But I have no real idea what sex feels like for a man – physically or emotionally. I can only hope I did it justice.


And now for the giveaway!

GIVEAWAY RULES:

To win an ebook copy (in epub or mobi format) of the Demons, Imps and Incubi anthology simply leave a comment and tell us: what is your favourite supernatural creature to read about?


Giveaway is open worldwide and ends on 10 July 2015!

Good luck!

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